I acquire consistently admired to assay adapted brands of swiss fake watches affluence watches. If comparing the above brand, there are replica watches uk not abounding differences you can accretion distant from the above of replica rolex uk the replica. You can accretion some of the best Patek Philippe replica watches and acquire abolishment to rolex replica say added than your architectonics or you could accretion bigger above and a lower replica hublot watches casting and achieve your best easier.

That Annoying "The publisher could not be verified" Prompt In Windows 7 — Visual Basic Feng Shui

That Annoying "The publisher could not be verified" Prompt In Windows 7

Filed under Tweaks, Utilities, Vista, Windows 7

I’ve just finished paving my main machine with Windows 7 64 bit, and was working on tidying up some of the finer points of my installation.

One minor item I use is a batch file with a reference to the excellent Poweroff utility. The batch file basically powers down the monitor, locks the machine, then goes into standby/hibernate mode. I attach it to a Ctrl-f11 hotkey to make it a quick keystroke to powerdown my machine.

Anyway, I have that bat on my path, and I happen to keep it out on a network drive (a NAS array), not on my local machine. I generally keep data off my local machine, preferring to only have program installs and temp files locally.

But when I pointed my shortcut to the network path and hit Ctrl-F11, I’d get that annoying “The publisher could not be verified” prompt. Every time!

Well, a few googles later and I came across this tip on annoyances.com.

It’s for Vista, but it also works in Win 7 (even the 64bit version).


Run gpedit.msc 

Go to User Configuration >> Administrative Templates >> Windows Components >> Attachment
Manager

Add "*.exe; *.bat" to the "Inclusion list for moderate risk file types" setting.

I added *.bat to the list, as well as *.exe because, in my case, I keep a number of handy BAT files in folders out on my network drives and then include those folders in my path.

Works a treat. Be sure to read up on why to include this in the Moderate risk element and not the High Risk, though. Generally, if you have a reasonably good firewall/router, making this change should be safe.

2 Comments

  1. shadow says:

    doesnt work windows dont have gpedit.msc

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*